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Nat
09-03-2011, 03:45 PM
I just wanted to start a thread for generation X-ers. Here are some perspectives on our generation:

W-LA9JPIsL


From http://www.jour.unr.edu/outpost/specials/genx.overvw1.html (this one is an old article)

"Generation X can technically be defined as the generation following the Baby Boomers. Xers were born between 1965 and 1980, 1961 and 1981, 1964 and 1979, 1963 and 1979, 1965 and 1975 or since the mid-1960s, depending on which source you use. For practical purposes we will say that Generation X was born between 1965 and 1980, now ranging in age from 17-32 and usually judged by characteristics assigned to them by the media.

Generation Xers were brought up on television, Atari 2600s and personal computers. They are the generation that was raised in the 1970s and 1980s, and saw this country undergo a selfish phase that they do not want to repeat.

"Generation X grew up in the 'me generation' of the 1980s, and now they are able to see that it is not all it is cracked up to be," said Jackie Shelton, 31, vice president of Minor Advertising in Reno.

The term Generation X came from a book written in 1991 by Douglas Coupland by the same name. It is a fictional book about three strangers who decide to distance themselves from society to get a better sense of who they are. He describes the characters as "underemployed, overeducated, intensely private and unpredictable."

Coupland took his book's title from another book "Class," by Paul Fussell. Fussell used "X" to describe a group of people who want to pull away from class, status and money in society. Because the characters in Coupland's book fit that description, he decided on the title "Generation X."

The media found elements of Coupland's characters' lives in America's youth and labeled them Generation X. This stereotypical definition leads society to believe that Generation X is made up of cynical, hopeless, frustrated and unmotivated slackers who wear grunge clothing, listen to alternative music and still live at home because they cannot get real jobs. It is a label that has stuck, stereotypes and all.

http://www.coachingandmentoring.com/Articles/x's.html (this one is also older)

"Coaching Generation X"

It has been said that Generation X is the most ignored, misunderstood, and disheartened generation our country has seen in a long time. No one can define who belongs to Generation X. While most agree that there is a generation after the Boomers, no one agrees on who it is. In a September 23, 1996, article in USA Today, six experts defined Generation X, each with a different answer. They ranged anywhere from those born between 1961 to 1981 (78 to 85 million) to those born between 1965 to 1976 (46 million). Although Generation X appears to be the accepted term, other labels have been applied. William Strauss and Neil Howe refer to them as the Thirteenth Generation (the thirteenth generation since the founding of our country). Baby Busters and Twentysomethings have also been used.

One of the most fundamental requirements for effective coaching is the ability to understand others' motives, values, and goals, not enforcing one's own on others. A slight variation of the Golden Rule-instead of "treating others as you want to be treated," coaches should "treat others as they want to be treated." This means understanding, and accepting, that people are all different. It also means that there is no "script" for coaching-it is different for every person you coach.

The need to understand differences is especially apparent in the ongoing conflict between Baby Boomers and Generation X. These struggles are rooted in the desire (on both sides) to want everyone to be alike. This would certainly make our lives and relationships easier, but it is not based in reality. Of course, clashes between generations are not new. Remember the generation gap in the 1960s between the Boomers and the Silent Generation?

The fact remains that Generation X are the employees that are entering the workforce today; they are the future. They aren't going away, nor are they likely to conform to the previous generation's definition of work. Boomer managers cannot continue to ignore Xers' differences and try to manage them according to their own mindset. This does not mean agreement with an Xer's attitude but, understanding them to make coaching easier. The better you know them, the more likely you are to have insight to their "hot buttons"-what motivates them. And, at the very best, understanding them may begin to remove the conflict and hostility that exists between the generations and will lead to positive actions and results that are mutually beneficial to the individual and the organization.

The problem with generalizations is that they only go so far and stereotyping runs the risk of alienation. There are always exceptions to the rule, those who will say "that's not me". I can sometimes identify with Boomers and sometimes with Xers (you guess my age!). It is impossible to suggest a prototype for how to coach 46-85 million people. As a start, the generalizations made here are based on a review of the relevant literature and personal observations/discussion with coaches-all with the hope of understanding this generation and offering suggestions on how to effectively coach them. To successfully coach and help Generation X, we must learn what they want, how they feel, and how they view their world.

WHAT WON'T MOTIVATE?

Generation X won't do things because they have a deep sense of mission, or loyalty to an organization. They have nothing but disdain for corporate politics and bureaucracy and don't trust any institution. They grew up watching their parents turn into workaholics, only to be downsized and restructured out of their chosen careers. They believe work is a thing you do to have a life (work doesn't define their life).

During the practice situations in our coaching workshops, the coach will often say-"Your behavior is affecting the company and if you don't change, we won't be in business in the long term." They raise the company flag and pull out the loyalty line. This means nothing to Xers-it will not capture their interest, raise their awareness, or stir them to new thoughts, feelings, and actions.

Xers have no expectation of job security, so they tend to see every job as temporary and every company as a stepping stone to something better, or at least to something else. They have been accused of not wanting to pay their dues. But, in today's changing workplace, anyone who is thinking about doing a job long enough to pay dues is out of touch!

Because they won't put in long hours at what they mostly term "dead end" jobs (Douglas Coupland coined the term "Mcjobs,") and they don't exhibit the same loyalty as Boomers do towards an organization, they have been called slackers. However, Xers will work very hard for a job that they believe in, for something that challenges them. In a l995 survey, Babson College Professor Paul Reynolds found that "10% of Americans between the ages of 25-34 are actively involved in creating a start-up company, a rate about three times as high as any other age group...it should help dispel once and for all the myth that today's youth are motivationally challenged." (U.S. News and World Report, September 23, 1996)

WHAT DOES MOTIVATE?

Value The Individual and Nurture Relationships. Although there doesn't seem to be one description of Generation X, most will agree that a defining characteristic is that they don't like to be characterized (as I'm doing in this article!). They don't want to be treated as a single entity, but want to be looked at as individuals. In addition, this is the first wave of latchkey kids to hit the work force. They are homesick for the home they never had (due to both parents working). Their focus on relationships over achievement is what leads Boomers to complain about their laziness. Isn't this strong sense of community and personal relationships in the workplace just what we need?

Challenging Work. This generation has sometimes been called the MTV Generation because of their short attention span. Xers want new challenges and the opportunity to build new skills. Training is one of the best motivators. They have a tremendous capacity to process lots of information and concentrate on multiple tasks.

They don't want to spend a lot of time talking about things or having meetings. They want to get in, do the work, and move on to the next thing. If you're looking for someone to deliver a report every week, you don't want an Xer. I recently brought up the subject of understanding twentysomethings during a coaching workshop. Immediately a manager complained, with a lot of emotion, that kids today don't want to work and will only stay for a week or so and then leave. Well, the job was very repetitive and offered little challenge. No wonder!l



From http://legalcareers.about.com/od/practicetips/a/GenerationX.htm

"Generation X encompasses the 44 to 50 million Americans born between 1965 and 1980. This generation marks the period of birth decline after the baby boom and is significantly smaller than previous and succeeding generations.

Members of Generation X are largely in their 30’s and early 40’s. On the whole, they are more ethnically diverse and better educated than the Baby Boomers. Over 60% of Generation X attended college.
...

Below are a few common characteristics of Generation X.

Individualistic: Generation X came of age in an era of two-income families, rising divorce rates and a faltering economy. Women were joining the workforce in large numbers, spawning an age of “latch-key” children. As a result, Generation X is independent, resourceful and self-sufficient. In the workplace, Generation X values freedom and responsibility. Many in this generation display a casual disdain for authority and structured work hours. They dislike being micro-managed and embrace a hands-off management philosophy.

Technologically Adept: The Generation X mentality reflects a shift from a manufacturing economy to a service economy. The first generation to grow up with computers, technology is woven into their lives. As law firms and corporate legal departments integrate new technological tools, Generation X has learned and adapted. This generation is comfortable using PDAs, cellphones, e-mail, laptops, Blackberrys and other technology employed in the legal workplace.

Flexible: Many Gen Xers lived through tough economic times in the 1980s and saw their workaholic parents lose hard-earned positions. Thus, Generation X is less committed to one employer and more willing to change jobs to get ahead than previous generations. They adapt well to change and are tolerant of alternative lifestyles. Generation X is ambitious and eager to learn new skills but want to accomplish things on their own terms.

Value Work/Life Balance: Unlike previous generations, members of Generation X work to live rather than live to work. They appreciate fun in the workplace and espouse a work hard/play hard mentality. Generation X managers often incorporate humor and games into work activities."

Reader
09-03-2011, 04:25 PM
I think the idea of this thread is a great one. I wonder if it may evolve into a "Remember 'Pop-Rocks'"? thread.....Not that there's anything wrong with that! (Yeah, I think many GenXers love Seinfeld)

I personally liked growing up when I did because I got the influence of the 60s to some degree and the 70s and 80s. I don't feel particularly jaded or money-driven and I am pretty sure I'm not very materialistic.

I kind of feel like I got the best of all worlds...the hippy/peace/music/liberation aspect of the 60s mixed with the fun, hijinks and appreciation of technology from the 70s-80s. I also got the strong work ethic and character of my semi-depression era parents.

I enjoyed TV much better then, too, when they actually had WRITERS. Same with films. You would not even be able to have some of those shows on today...the thought police would swoop down and get them off the air.

Good thread. I can't wait to read the posts.

Nat
09-03-2011, 05:12 PM
I found it difficult to find recent material on gen x by gen x-ers.

These are some of the movies I think of as embodying our generation:

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hsv_NQFbQzo

pynkkameleon
06-05-2012, 12:52 PM
Hoping that a bump might give this thread a little bit of life. There are many gen x'ers on the site.. surely someone else has something more to add?

Nat
06-05-2012, 08:52 PM
ZUI7mo6tQpM

DapperButch
06-05-2012, 09:16 PM
Hoping that a bump might give this thread a little bit of life. There are many gen x'ers on the site.. surely someone else has something more to add?

:sock:
--

imperfect_cupcake
06-06-2012, 05:37 AM
One of the best movies I've seen on Gen X attitude was "Slackers" - conspiracy theory, disillusioned, independent and slightly grumpy, non-religious. Douglas Coupland did a fantastic book about this in "Life After God" as one of the majour things affecting GenX was the constant impending threat of nuclear war. I remember the bomb sirens being tested every so often on a sunday. I remember Peace Day (now earth day) when 80,000 people marched across the lions gate bridge against warheads. Carl Sagan's Cosmos series warning people to treasure the earth, AIDs information packs being given to us at highschool in sex ed (age 14).

I used to wake up, frozen, literally unable to move I was so scared, waiting for the "wave" to hit me when thunder woke me up. Once planes zoomed low over the house to drop antimoth spray at 4am and I had the same reaction, heart in my throat. I couldn't stop shaking after I could move and I realised it was the spray team.

I no longer dream of nuclear war and AIDs. It stopped when I was about 26/7. The world seemed a bit safer, I guess.

Movies - When The Wind Blows, Threads, Wargames... it was a very, very big deal. It affected a lot of our psyches. What was the point of anything if we are all going to be blown to shit? at anytime? All those warheads and missile silos... what happened to them? what happened to the peace agreements? where did all the protesters go?

I honestly didn't think I was going to make 30 when I was a teen.

chefhmboyrd
06-06-2012, 08:01 AM
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chefhmboyrd
06-06-2012, 08:03 AM
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chefhmboyrd
06-06-2012, 08:04 AM
slsscnpNGZ4&feature=related

chefhmboyrd
06-06-2012, 08:07 AM
q0nKcHaQowY&feature=related

chefhmboyrd
06-06-2012, 08:08 AM
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chefhmboyrd
06-06-2012, 08:09 AM
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chefhmboyrd
06-06-2012, 08:11 AM
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chefhmboyrd
06-06-2012, 08:15 AM
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chefhmboyrd
06-06-2012, 08:18 AM
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LaneyDoll
06-06-2012, 08:21 AM
I honestly didn't think I was going to make 30 when I was a teen.

Same here. I do not think it was the movies for me though but I find your point of view to be interesting.

:sparklyheart:

femmeInterrupted
05-15-2013, 09:45 AM
http://etd.ohiolink.edu/send-pdf.cgi/Bly%20Elizabeth%20Ann.pdf?case1259803398

Partial Abstract:

Generation X and the Invention of a Third Feminist Wave is a study of late twentieth century feminist activism, popular culture, and the gendered implications of the 1990s political conflict known as the culture wars. The dissertation explores two inextricably linked phenomena: Generation X and third wave feminism. Third wave, what I term “GenX,” feminism emerged as an example of political action in an age of paralyzing ironic detachment. GenX feminism surfaced at a time in history when it seemed impossible to incite political activism based solely on gender. Feminists of this generation understood the ways in which various socially constructed categories of identity intermingled and produced social inequality. As activists and scholars grappled with the complex implications of the intersections of identity, markers such as “woman” came to be understood as problematically limiting concepts. In charting the life cycle of white, middle-class GenX women, this dissertation illuminates the forces that shaped the generation’s worldview. It also elucidates the ways in which GenX feminism both challenged and maintained conventions of femininity and feminist activism during the last decade of the twentieth century.

It's long, but worth the read if these two intersections interest you :)

femmeInterrupted
05-22-2013, 07:28 PM
http://www.emptyage.com/post/11591863916/generation-x-doesnt-want-to-hear-it

Generation X Doesn’t Want to Hear It

Earlier generations have weathered recessions, of course; this stall we’re in has the look of something nastier. Social Security and Medicare are going to be diminished, at best. Hours worked are up even as hiring staggers along: Blood from a stone looks to be the normal order of things “going forward,” to borrow the business-speak. Economists are warning that even when the economy recuperates, full employment will be lower and growth will be slower—a sad little rhyme that adds up to something decidedly ­unpoetic. A majority of Americans say, for the first time ever, that this generation will not be better off than its parents.

— New York Magazine

Generation X is sick of your bullshit.

The first generation to do worse than its parents? Please. Been there. Generation X was told that so many times that it can’t even read those words without hearing Winona Ryder’s voice in its heads. Or maybe it’s Ethan Hawke’s. Possibly Bridget Fonda’s. Generation X is getting older, and can’t remember those movies so well anymore. In retrospect, maybe they weren’t very good to begin with.

But Generation X is tired of your sense of entitlement. Generation X also graduated during a recession. It had even shittier jobs, and actually had to pay for its own music. (At least, when music mattered most to it.) Generation X is used to being fucked over. It lost its meager savings in the dot-com bust. Then came George Bush, and 9/11, and the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Generation X bore the brunt of all that. And then came the housing crisis.

Generation X wasn’t surprised. Generation X kind of expected it.

Generation X is a journeyman. It didn’t invent hip hop, or punk rock, or even electronica (it’s pretty sure those dudes in Kraftwerk are boomers) but it perfected all of them, and made them its own. It didn’t invent the Web, but it largely built the damn thing. Generation X gave you Google and Twitter and blogging; Run DMC and Radiohead and Nirvana and Notorious B.I.G. Not that it gets any credit.

But that’s okay. Generation X is used to being ignored, stuffed between two much larger, much more vocal, demographics. But whatever! Generation X is self-sufficient. It was a latchkey child. Its parents were too busy fulfilling their own personal ambitions to notice any of its trophies—which were admittedly few and far between because they were only awarded for victories, not participation.

In fairness, Generation X could use a better spokesperson. Barack Obama is just a little too senior to count among its own, and it has debts older than Mark Zuckerberg. Generation X hasn’t had a real voice since Kurt Cobain blew his brains out, Tupac was murdered, Jeff Mangum went crazy, David Foster Wallace hung himself, Jeff Buckley drowned, River Phoenix overdosed, Elliott Smith stabbed himself (twice) in the heart, Axl got fat.

Generation X is beyond all that bullshit now. It quit smoking and doing coke a long time ago. It has blood pressure issues and is heavier than it would like to be. It might still take some ecstasy, if it knew where to get some. But probably not. Generation X has to be up really early tomorrow morning.

Generation X is tired.

It’s a parent now, and there’s always so damn much to do. Generation X wishes it had better health insurance and a deeper savings account. It wonders where its 30s went. It wonders if it still has time to catch up.

Right now, Generation X just wants a beer and to be left alone. It just wants to sit here quietly and think for a minute. Can you just do that, okay? It knows that you are so very special and so very numerous, but can you just leave it alone? Just for a little bit? Just long enough to sneak one last fucking cigarette? No?

Whatever. It’s cool.

Generation X is used to disappointments. Generation X knows you didn’t even read the whole thing. It doesn’t want or expect your reblogs; it picked the wrong platform.

Generation X should have posted this to LiveJournal.

DapperButch
05-22-2013, 07:45 PM
http://www.emptyage.com/post/11591863916/generation-x-doesnt-want-to-hear-it

Generation X Doesn’t Want to Hear It

Earlier generations have weathered recessions, of course; this stall we’re in has the look of something nastier. Social Security and Medicare are going to be diminished, at best. Hours worked are up even as hiring staggers along: Blood from a stone looks to be the normal order of things “going forward,” to borrow the business-speak. Economists are warning that even when the economy recuperates, full employment will be lower and growth will be slower—a sad little rhyme that adds up to something decidedly ­unpoetic. A majority of Americans say, for the first time ever, that this generation will not be better off than its parents.

— New York Magazine

Generation X is sick of your bullshit.

The first generation to do worse than its parents? Please. Been there. Generation X was told that so many times that it can’t even read those words without hearing Winona Ryder’s voice in its heads. Or maybe it’s Ethan Hawke’s. Possibly Bridget Fonda’s. Generation X is getting older, and can’t remember those movies so well anymore. In retrospect, maybe they weren’t very good to begin with.

But Generation X is tired of your sense of entitlement. Generation X also graduated during a recession. It had even shittier jobs, and actually had to pay for its own music. (At least, when music mattered most to it.) Generation X is used to being fucked over. It lost its meager savings in the dot-com bust. Then came George Bush, and 9/11, and the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Generation X bore the brunt of all that. And then came the housing crisis.

Generation X wasn’t surprised. Generation X kind of expected it.

Generation X is a journeyman. It didn’t invent hip hop, or punk rock, or even electronica (it’s pretty sure those dudes in Kraftwerk are boomers) but it perfected all of them, and made them its own. It didn’t invent the Web, but it largely built the damn thing. Generation X gave you Google and Twitter and blogging; Run DMC and Radiohead and Nirvana and Notorious B.I.G. Not that it gets any credit.

But that’s okay. Generation X is used to being ignored, stuffed between two much larger, much more vocal, demographics. But whatever! Generation X is self-sufficient. It was a latchkey child. Its parents were too busy fulfilling their own personal ambitions to notice any of its trophies—which were admittedly few and far between because they were only awarded for victories, not participation.

In fairness, Generation X could use a better spokesperson. Barack Obama is just a little too senior to count among its own, and it has debts older than Mark Zuckerberg. Generation X hasn’t had a real voice since Kurt Cobain blew his brains out, Tupac was murdered, Jeff Mangum went crazy, David Foster Wallace hung himself, Jeff Buckley drowned, River Phoenix overdosed, Elliott Smith stabbed himself (twice) in the heart, Axl got fat.

Generation X is beyond all that bullshit now. It quit smoking and doing coke a long time ago. It has blood pressure issues and is heavier than it would like to be. It might still take some ecstasy, if it knew where to get some. But probably not. Generation X has to be up really early tomorrow morning.

Generation X is tired.

It’s a parent now, and there’s always so damn much to do. Generation X wishes it had better health insurance and a deeper savings account. It wonders where its 30s went. It wonders if it still has time to catch up.

Right now, Generation X just wants a beer and to be left alone. It just wants to sit here quietly and think for a minute. Can you just do that, okay? It knows that you are so very special and so very numerous, but can you just leave it alone? Just for a little bit? Just long enough to sneak one last fucking cigarette? No?

Whatever. It’s cool.

Generation X is used to disappointments. Generation X knows you didn’t even read the whole thing. It doesn’t want or expect your reblogs; it picked the wrong platform.

Generation X should have posted this to LiveJournal.

This is awesome! ha!

Soon
05-22-2013, 07:57 PM
http://www.emptyage.com/post/11591863916/generation-x-doesnt-want-to-hear-it


Love it.


.

imperfect_cupcake
05-23-2013, 02:45 AM
I look at the Hipsters in the drive and I first thought "hey, why are they all dressing like we did but frumpier and with the glasses missing from the frames?"

then I realised that the hipsters are being ironic about our irony. Meta irony. but they don't really know it. unaware meta-irony. that's, like, deep, deep irony.

tossers. I wish the indie beer hadn't gotten so over priced.

and why do all the bands sound like Mud Honey did 20 years ago, except worse?

Someone asked me who Douglas Coupland was. In fucking Vancouver. I just said "oh, nevermind." and sighed, looked at some scent free, carboard-recycled liquid laundy soap bottles on the shelf and wondered why things that we actually fought for, environmentally was being packaged and then sold at twice the price. that wasn't the point.

I still haven't paid off my student loan.

spritzerJ
05-23-2013, 04:46 AM
Struggling how to put up with people while the "go through their process" knowing they are going to learn it is all just a pile of BS in the end.

I know they won't believe me though. And it will take a long time.

I'm not cynical. I just know what I can and can't really change. And any thing short of a revolution is only worth so much.

femmeInterrupted
05-29-2013, 02:31 PM
http://media-cache-ec2.pinimg.com/originals/fb/ba/2f/fbba2fd768d397cbaebadf61be752fe8.jpg

Tuff Stuff
08-25-2015, 08:05 PM
I used to wake up, frozen, literally unable to move I was so scared, waiting for the "wave" to hit me when thunder woke me up. Once planes zoomed low over the house to drop antimoth spray at 4am and I had the same reaction, heart in my throat. I couldn't stop shaking after I could move and I realised it was the spray team.

It affected a lot of our psyches. What was the point of anything if we are all going to be blown to shit? at anytime? All those warheads and missile silos... what happened to them? what happened to the peace agreements? where did all the protesters go?

I honestly didn't think I was going to make 30 when I was a teen.

Felt the same way...it really hasn't gone away you know,what with this crazy business with Russia all over the news..all those fears are back.

:pacman: <---- ahhh,this was a favorite past time.

JDeere
08-25-2015, 08:09 PM
I wonder who in here is really a Generation Xer!

the cut off year for a gen xer is 1979 and the begin date is 1965.

Gemme
08-25-2015, 08:17 PM
I am.

JDeere
08-25-2015, 08:46 PM
Same here! I get tired of the non Gen xer's saying shit about our generation!