Butch Femme Planet

Butch Femme Planet (http://www.butchfemmeplanet.com/forum/index.php)
-   Words Games, Quizzes, Etc. (http://www.butchfemmeplanet.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=132)
-   -   Whatzat mean? Word origins. (http://www.butchfemmeplanet.com/forum/showthread.php?t=6556)

Sweet Bliss 05-05-2013 08:51 AM

Whatzat mean? Word origins.
 
Have you ever wondered about the original meaning of words?

Who used it? Who started it? What we use it for now?

I find it facinating. Maybe we could learn together about the

Magical World of Words


Here is a help center: http://etymonline.com/

Sweet Bliss 05-05-2013 09:07 AM

Okay, I'll start.

goober


To me it means: I care deeply for you, if you are a fur baby I love and adore you, it is a term of endearment, and I use it very sparingly. I find you cute and adorable, and if you are close I will squeeze, hug, kiss you and mess up your hair a little, and yes I will fix it back for you.

Here's what the dictionary says:

goober (n.)
"peanut," 1833, American English, of African origin, perhaps Bantu (cf. Kikongo and Kimbundu nguba "peanut").


:blink: who knew?

macele 05-05-2013 10:43 AM

groovy (adj.)
1853 in literal sense of "pertaining to a groove," from groove (n.) + -y (2). Slang sense of "first-rate, excellent" is 1937, American English, from jazz slang phrase in the groove (1932) "performing well (without grandstanding.)" As teen slang for "wonderful," it dates from 1944; popularized 1960s, out of currency by 1980. Related: Grooviness.

macele 05-05-2013 10:47 AM

December (n.)
c.1000, from Old French decembre, from Latin December, from decem "ten" (see ten); tenth month of the old Roman calendar, which began with March.

The -ber in four Latin month names is probably from -bris, an adjectival suffix. Tucker thinks that the first five months were named for their positions in the agricultural cycle, and "after the gathering in of the crops, the months were merely numbered."
If the word contains an element related to mensis, we must assume a *decemo-membris (from *-mensris). October must then be by analogy from a false division Sep-tem-ber &c. Perhaps, however, from *de-cem(o)-mr-is, i.e. "forming the tenth part or division," from *mer- ..., while October = *octuo-mr-is. [T.G. Tucker, "Etymological Dictionary of Latin"]

Sweet Bliss 05-05-2013 12:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by macele (Post 793897)
groovy (adj.)
1853 in literal sense of "pertaining to a groove," from groove (n.) + -y (2). Slang sense of "first-rate, excellent" is 1937, American English, from jazz slang phrase in the groove (1932) "performing well (without grandstanding.)" As teen slang for "wonderful," it dates from 1944; popularized 1960s, out of currency by 1980. Related: Grooviness.

Ah, Jazz, REAL AMERICAN music!! All the way back to 1932? Thanks Macele!!

I love learning. :glasses:

PaPa 05-05-2013 09:20 PM

Thanks Sweet Bliss for beginning this thread. It sounds like it could be fun learning new things! I looked up Dregs. I always believed it meant undesireables like the phrase "dregs of society". I recently used those particular words in a paper for school to point out the societal view of addicts in their addictions. The site you provided had this to say:

dregs (n.)
c.1300 (implied in surname Dryngedregges), from Old Norse dregg "sediment," from Proto-Germanic *drag- (cf. Old High German trestir, German Trester "grapeskins, husks"), from PIE *dher- (1) "to make muddy." Replaced Old English cognate dræst, dærst "dregs, lees." Figurative use is from 1530s.

'Sediment' or 'to make muddy' would probably be what led to that phrase being used. Another way of saying scum of the Earth.

Sweet Bliss 05-06-2013 07:34 AM

That's amazing!
 
Thanks for sharing this info with us PaPa!! I would have never guessed. What an interesting story behind the word. I would think there are lots of "regular" words we have no idea about pertaining to mental health and class issues.

Wow. Brings to mind the class system in India, and the work of Mother Teresa.

Teddybear 05-06-2013 08:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sweet Bliss (Post 793819)
Okay, I'll start.

goober


To me it means: I care deeply for you, if you are a fur baby I love and adore you, it is a term of endearment, and I use it very sparingly. I find you cute and adorable, and if you are close I will squeeze, hug, kiss you and mess up your hair a little, and yes I will fix it back for you.

Here's what the dictionary says:

goober (n.)
"peanut," 1833, American English, of African origin, perhaps Bantu (cf. Kikongo and Kimbundu nguba "peanut").


:blink: who knew?

those of us from the south who grew up eating goobers knew its a great thing chocolate covered peanuts

Sweet Bliss 05-06-2013 08:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Teddybear (Post 794321)
those of us from the south who grew up eating goobers knew its a great thing chocolate covered peanuts

YUMMY !!! :chocolate: Wonder if Peanut M&M's stole that idea??? Hummm.

So, if I call someone a goober, does that mean they are good enough to eat??:blush:

Sweet Bliss 05-07-2013 04:53 PM

Years ago I called my baby brother Pipsqueak, my mother got angry, told me to look it up.

I did. It meant insignificant person. I loved and adored my baby brother, so I stopped calling him the icky word.

Today I find out, pipsqueak means much more.

http://www.firstworldwar.com/atoz/pipsqueakwilfred.htm

It's also related to WWI medals awarded in England. And cartoon characters.

I thought it meant cute, little and adorable. I stand by my first assumption.


Love you Pipsqueak!! :rrose:

Sweet Bliss 05-23-2013 09:23 PM

For Logos Lovers
 
http://verbivore.com/wordpress/

Fadspeak: the unrelenting mix of mimicry and gimmickry. Fadspeak comprises vogue phrases that suddenly appear on everybody’s tongues — phrases that launch a thousand lips. Before you can say, “yada yada yada,” these throwaway expressions become instant clichés, perfect for our throwaway society, like paper wedding dresses for throwaway marriages. Fadspeak clichés lead mayfly lives, counting their duration in months instead of decades. They strut and fret their hour upon the stage of pop culture and then are heard no more.

This website is wonderful, funny and spot on.

puddin' 06-02-2013 03:35 PM

kiwi talk...
 
•gutted – devastated, disappointed.
•full on – it’s all happening, a lot going on.
•fulla – slang for fellow. usually an old man = an old fulla.
•handle the jandal – a saying that means how you cope with or manage a situation. (not sure how this saying came about..?).

homoe 08-22-2016 11:14 AM

Sweet Bliss, are we allowed to use phrases or just single words? IF we can use phrases....

rule of thumb

Origin 1782:The 'rule of thumb' has been said to derive from the belief that English law allowed a man to beat his wife with a stick so long as it is was no thicker than his thumb.

The first and original use of the saying is as simple as the words. The thumb was used as a readily available tool of measuring.

It has now been used as a term of commonplace knowledge in a field.

anotherbutch 08-22-2016 11:20 AM

Fuckery:

Derived from the word 'fuck', Fuckery is something that is absolute bullshit or utter nonsense.

That which is fucked up.

homoe 08-22-2016 11:44 AM

Does anyone know for sure if the origin of "Fuckery" is Jamaican? From what I could find it appears so at least:glasses:

Sweet Bliss 08-22-2016 06:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by homoe (Post 1084705)
Sweet Bliss, are we allowed to use phrases or just single words? IF we can use phrases....

rule of thumb

Origin 1782:The 'rule of thumb' has been said to derive from the belief that English law allowed a man to beat his wife with a stick so long as it is was no thicker than his thumb.

The first and original use of the saying is as simple as the words. The thumb was used as a readily available tool of measuring.

It has now been used as a term of commonplace knowledge in a field.

Sure!! It will add to the fun!

homoe 08-23-2016 04:44 AM

Go Dutch/Dutch Treat

The expression "Go Dutch" has its origin around 1652-1784, during the English-Dutch wars. Around that period, the English commonly used the word Dutch in a number of expressions to convey a negative feeling. The British considered the Dutch to be stingy and miserly and used the phrases involving the Dutch to imply derogatory remarks.

Go Dutch is generally used when two people out on a date share the expenses incurred.

homoe 08-24-2016 05:05 AM

Barking up the wrong tree............
 
origin:The origin of barking up the wrong tree dates back to early 1800s America, when hunting with packs of dogs was very popular. The term was used literally at first, when wily prey animals such as raccoons would trick dogs into believing they were up a certain tree when in fact they had escaped.


to be pursuing a mistaken or misguided line of thought or course of action.

cinnamongrrl 08-24-2016 08:47 AM

Omg I'm so happy for this thread!

Word origins have long fascinated me. There was a time when I considered becoming a linguistic anthropologist.

There was a show on cable about the origins of slang. Its interesting to see where our every day lexicon derives from. I was VERY surprised at the origination of y'all.

I will be back to read and post!!

homoe 08-25-2016 03:46 AM

Blessing In Disguise

origin of 'a blessing in disguise' is believed to be mid-1700s, however scholars have yet to pin down the first usage of the term. The earliest instance of the term found in print was a 1746 work by English writer James Hervey titled Reflections on a Flower-Garden.

A misfortune that unexpectedly turns into good fortune.


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:42 PM.

ButchFemmePlanet.com
All information copyright of BFP 2018