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kittygrrl 03-10-2019 03:19 PM

Politics-What's on your mind?
 
This is a thread to exchange ideas and views on what is happening currently in U.S. I would love it if everyone stays positive but even if you can't try to understand the other person's point of view. Differences of opinion are fine but let's be kind about it. Also another rule, no rehashing of 2016. It's only relevance is that the propaganda against some of the candidates kept people home and felt their vote didn't count. Let's not let that happen again!!!@@ Understanding each other's point of view is so important. Being heard is important. We don't have to agree but while we breath we are capable of listening & digesting other points of view. There is nothing to be afraid of but fear itself. Fear & Anger are the mind killers. Let's win in 2020!!!@@ Oh.....and ALL opinions are Welcome!!@@ You don't have to be U.S to come here and have a point of view! Welcome!!!@@

kittygrrl 03-10-2019 03:30 PM

My thoughts...i haven't been too involved in any of the political threads of late for personal reasons. Mostly having to do with the passionate defence and offense i took with certain points of view and one candidate in particular in 2016. I was insufferable and full of angst and where did it get me? Nowhere. I like to think I can learn from my mistakes. I miss Anya. I wish she were here to share how she feels. I've no real favorites at this point. I was really into Senator Kamela Harris at one point but lately she just comes off as smug and commercial...Warren is just out there with her latest idea of breaking up all the big tech companies. We are not living in Utopia and it's a pretty extreme point of view. I can see where facebook needs government oversight at this point because they keep using the personal information they gather to make money. ie, the latest, is our personal phone numbers they are selling...all of this seems out of control with Trump's attack on our freedom and the big tech companies trying to grab the rest...what are we supposed to do???? How can we protect ourselves???@@ Currently i'm more in the mood of asking questions and hearing what others think.....this helps me to think more clearly...is this weird??..don't know but it works for me..

homoe 03-10-2019 07:18 PM

I think I may enjoy posting in this thread more than the other political ones simply because it's called.........

Politics-What's on your mind?

What might be on my mind won't necessarily be on yours, and that's perfectly fine! I, like Kittygrrl, hope we can stay on the positive and kind side!

kittygrrl 03-10-2019 10:54 PM

just woke up ..just thinking of beto documentary on himself..umm i am just wondering why he made it? maybe he believes he's an icon or reincarnated kennedy?...he has a lot of oil & gas money behind him...so climate change isn't his thing. i'm curious why he was so popular and why he thinks he would be a good president?..just seems like more of the same, from here.:confused:

kittygrrl 03-11-2019 11:16 AM

CNN Townhall w/ Pete Buttigieg!

cathexis 03-12-2019 02:04 AM

What I'm concerned about is US involvement in other country's business, particularly Venezuela. I think we need to get out and stop trying to have a coup de tat against Meduro. It seems that most Venezuelans don't want us there interfering with their Sovereignty.

The US "humanitarian aid" was blocked by their people. They don't want to deal with the strings attached. Our Country is causing the blackout. Do we actually want people to be so gullable as to believe that a country with that much oil/natural gas is unable to keep their grid up! PLEASE.

Venezuelans want us out, Cuba has assured them that they won't face this alone. Bolivia is with them, as well. The US needs to bug out of Central and South America as well as the Caribbean. If they want to change their government, let them be. Countries in South America have been trying to have Socialist revolutions since before Che Guevara started working with them.
How can we prevent the US from making war in the region?

Martina 03-12-2019 02:45 AM

Maduro needs to go, but we're making it worse. So rare for US intervention to make it better. When it could help but it's not in "our interest," we don't bother, like in Rwanda. I get that the UN and Europe are worse than useless, but we almost never help. Maybe Haiti in 94, but Clinton admits he wouldn't have intervened there if he hadn't just royally screwed up re Rwanda. It's rare that we help and common that we spread destruction and death.

kittygrrl 03-12-2019 07:52 AM

On my mind-Should we impeach? In a perfect world, yes but to be honest I don't think it would ever clear the Senate. The extreme left would like to do it anyway..i don't think they are thinking too clearly. The moral high ground doesn't really work in the real world. The House would have enough votes, the Senate would cancel them out and who would win? If history is any indication, Trump would become even more popular. It seems the populus {at large) has gotten use to a lying, greedy, amoral President as the norm. The best we can do is get a decent candidate to run against him and concentrate on turning out the vote.

Also i keep hearing about Beto running...i'm so over it!!!@@

Martina 03-12-2019 08:15 AM

I don't like agreeing with Pelosi, but I agree that impeachment is a waste of time. Better to concentrate on electing Democratic Senators as well as a new President.

MsTinkerbelly 03-12-2019 09:00 AM

I’m not certain if ANYONE would be worse than Trump, but should he be impeached we will have Pence as President (unless they prove crimes against him), and we (the gays) would be under attack.

It’s like asking if you want to be tortured by electrocution until dead, or if you want to be water boarded until dead...you are still dead!

With the House under control of the Democrats, Trump is a little more limited in the damage he can do; voting him out seems our best avenue at the moment. That could change, if the crimes found by Mueller are enough to force him to be indicted and tried as the criminal he has always been.

~ocean 03-12-2019 12:50 PM

I agree tinker totally ~ Pelosi said it perfect impeachment of Trump ~ He's just not worth it.

homoe 03-12-2019 04:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Martina (Post 1242578)
I don't like agreeing with Pelosi, but I agree that impeachment is a waste of time. Better to concentrate on electing Democratic Senators as well as a new President.



:goodpost:.......

Orema 03-12-2019 05:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ~ocean (Post 1242594)
I agree tinker totally ~ Pelosi said it perfect impeachment of Trump ~ He's just not worth it.

I think he’s not worth the effort only because it would be a useless effort.

And it’s exactly what he and his following would use to position him as a victim.

Still, history will not be kind to Trump, McConnel, Graham, Collins, Ryan, the lot of them. There is that.

kittygrrl 03-15-2019 06:08 AM

saw Beto rollout....hohum...but i'm possibly jaded...i like mayor pete best so far..he answers directly..i like that..and it's hard for me to like anything about politics these days...

tantalizingfemme 03-16-2019 06:24 AM

I am pretty politically active in my state. There has been so much infighting that there is a huge divide within the democratic party. Splinter groups are created regularly. If this is indicative of what is happening nationally, I believe we will have Trump back for 4 more years.

C0LLETTE 03-16-2019 09:41 AM

I'm curious. What exactly is so appealing about Beto except that he is tall ? What desperate battle has he ever fought; what position has he ever defended that would have have threatened his position of white (tall ) privilege?

Non- Americans may have no say in the voting in American political elections. But I assure you we have a huge stake in the outcome.

Kätzchen 03-16-2019 10:27 AM

I'm choosing to believe in people making a better choice, come the next presidential election. I know that for me, I will be voting a democratic ticket, for whoever the Democratic nominee turns out to be.

I don't believe that Americans will stand by and watch out country go down in flames. It's seems fairly obvious, each day that goes by, that journalists are keeping Americans apprised of the highly politically charged issues our country is facing.

It's never too late to do the right thing, so that's what's been on my mind and it's what I'm choosing to believe in.

I also feel that Democrats in the US House are working a relentless schedule, and keeping on top of things that needs the attention it deserves, as well as The Press.

<<<<<<<~~~ Voting Blue (Democratic Ticket).

CherylNYC 03-16-2019 02:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MsTinkerbelly (Post 1242580)
I’m not certain if ANYONE would be worse than Trump, but should he be impeached we will have Pence as President (unless they prove crimes against him), and we (the gays) would be under attack.

It’s like asking if you want to be tortured by electrocution until dead, or if you want to be water boarded until dead...you are still dead!

With the House under control of the Democrats, Trump is a little more limited in the damage he can do; voting him out seems our best avenue at the moment. That could change, if the crimes found by Mueller are enough to force him to be indicted and tried as the criminal he has always been.

I disagree. A person who commits a crime should face legal consequences. Any/every person. When, (or if), the Mueller report ever comes out the legislature must act in accordance with the US Constitution. No matter what. Trump has been undermining so many of our institutions on a daily basis that I fear for our future. Failure of the legislative branch to act as a co-equal branch of government with appropriate oversight of the Executive branch further undermines the rule of law.

Yes, Pence is scary. No, I don't think acting as if he's an insurance policy against impeachment is the right plan. Excusing a sitting President from responsibility for his crimes would be remarkably shortsighted. Let's remember that this is all playing out against a backdrop of howling mad keyboard warriors from the left who started calling for Trump's impeachment before that evil f*ck even took office. Impeachment is a drastic action taken against someone who has committed high crimes and misdemeanors WHILE IN OFFICE! Those premature calls for impeachment undermined the credibility of anyone who has legitimately called for impeachment ever since.

Frankly, I doubt that Pelosi intends to protect Trump from impeachment. I think she's positioning herself for maximum credibility when the Mueller report is finally released. Assuming that the Mueller report finds criminal malfeasance on Trump's part, (treason, obstruction of justice, etc.), I expect Pelosi to initiate impeachment at that point.

kittygrrl 03-16-2019 03:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MsTinkerbelly (Post 1242580)

It’s like asking if you want to be tortured by electrocution until dead, or if you want to be water boarded until dead...you are still dead!

I am absorbing all the interesting comments in this thread...compact thought (with intelligence) said beautifully!!@@

I especially love MsTinkerbell's funny observation about choosing!@@..I'm going to use it in rt, hope she won't mind!:byebye:

MsTinkerbelly 03-16-2019 05:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kittygrrl (Post 1242912)
I am absorbing all the interesting comments in this thread...compact thought (with intelligence) said beautifully!!@@

I especially love MsTinkerbell's funny observation about choosing!@@..I'm going to use it in rt, hope she won't mind!:byebye:

Quote:

Originally Posted by CherylNYC (Post 1242910)
I disagree. A person who commits a crime should face legal consequences. Any/every person. When, (or if), the Mueller report ever comes out the legislature must act in accordance with the US Constitution. No matter what. Trump has been undermining so many of our institutions on a daily basis that I fear for our future. Failure of the legislative branch to act as a co-equal branch of government with appropriate oversight of the Executive branch further undermines the rule of law.

Yes, Pence is scary. No, I don't think acting as if he's an insurance policy against impeachment is the right plan. Excusing a sitting President from responsibility for his crimes would be remarkably shortsighted. Let's remember that this is all playing out against a backdrop of howling mad keyboard warriors from the left who started calling for Trump's impeachment before that evil f*ck even took office. Impeachment is a drastic action taken against someone who has committed high crimes and misdemeanors WHILE IN OFFICE! Those premature calls for impeachment undermined the credibility of anyone who has legitimately called for impeachment ever since.

Frankly, I doubt that Pelosi intends to protect Trump from impeachment. I think she's positioning herself for maximum credibility when the Mueller report is finally released. Assuming that the Mueller report finds criminal malfeasance on Trump's part, (treason, obstruction of justice, etc.), I expect Pelosi to initiate impeachment at that point.

** kittygirl i’m Flattered

I did not advocate that Trump NOT be charged or impeached, I only pointed out that you (collective you) should be careful what you wish for.

Kätzchen 03-18-2019 09:20 PM

Robert Reich
 
Yesterday, late in the evening, I had come across a channel on YouTube, authored by Robert Reich. I like what he is doing, by creating videos to help educate the general public on what is factual vs what is not factual.

Here's a few of his videos, in case anyone would like to see what Robert Reich is up too, lately. It's timely, I think, because currently factual information is hard to come by, when a person doesn't really know the backstory of how America has gone from point A to point B, then from point Z back to point C, and so forth.

Here's four videos I felt answered some questions I had about missing elements in oft repeated stories we hear in the news concerning taxes, the deficit, privatization, etc.

See what you think about the message Robert Reich is making via his videos in order to counter misinformation or disinformation we often encounter while reading news articles or while listening to news on the radio or TV.

Video 1: What's The Real American Story?

Video 2: The Monopolization of America

Video 3: The Truth About Privatization

Video 4: The Yuge Republican Lie About The Deficit

dark_crystal 03-19-2019 05:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tantalizingfemme (Post 1242882)
I am pretty politically active in my state. There has been so much infighting that there is a huge divide within the democratic party. Splinter groups are created regularly. If this is indicative of what is happening nationally, I believe we will have Trump back for 4 more years.

I feel like that divide is very generational, and we have to address it as generational

I listened to two episodes of Chapo Traphouse this week-- one where the hosts had attended CPAC and one where Costas Lapavitsas explained how the EU is undemocratic.

One thing that stood out in each podcast was their observation that Generation X is missing from the extremes on both sides: CPAC was all Boomers or Millennials, and the Socialist movement in Europe is the same-- either young folks or older folks, no Xers.

Both Boomers and Millennials are overrepresented in the online discourse, bc one group has lots of time and one group has lots of skills. Xers are underrepresented.

This has allowed the extremes to disproportionately drive the discourse.

This has worked out OK for Republicans, bc they are ultrapartisan, and vote in lockstep even if they have to hold their nose-- but it is NOT going to work for Democrats. We are tribal, too, but on a much smaller scale.

Tons of Dems held their nose and voted for Hillary, but i believe even more Republicans were holding their nose for Trump.

That is why we're screwed. Republicans can elect a hold-your-nose candidate. Dems can't.

tantalizingfemme 03-19-2019 05:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dark_crystal (Post 1243042)
I feel like that divide is very generational, and we have to address it as generational

I listened to two episodes of Chapo Traphouse this week-- one where the hosts had attended CPAC and one where Costas Lapavitsas explained how the EU is undemocratic.

One thing that stood out in each podcast was their observation that Generation X is missing from the extremes on both sides: CPAC was all Boomers or Millennials, and the Socialist movement in Europe is the same-- either young folks or older folks, no Xers.

Both Boomers and Millennials are overrepresented in the online discourse, bc one group has lots of time and one group has lots of skills. Xers are underrepresented.

This has allowed the extremes to disproportionately drive the discourse.

This has worked out OK for Republicans, bc they are ultrapartisan, and vote in lockstep even if they have to hold their nose-- but it is NOT going to work for Democrats. We are tribal, too, but on a much smaller scale.

Tons of Dems held their nose and voted for Hillary, but i believe even more Republicans were holding their nose for Trump.

That is why we're screwed. Republicans can elect a hold-your-nose candidate. Dems can't.

Bingo. This is exactly what is happening.

cathexis 03-19-2019 11:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dark_crystal (Post 1243042)
I feel like that divide is very generational, and we have to address it as generational

I listened to two episodes of Chapo Traphouse this week-- one where the hosts had attended CPAC and one where Costas Lapavitsas explained how the EU is undemocratic.

One thing that stood out in each podcast was their observation that Generation X is missing from the extremes on both sides: CPAC was all Boomers or Millennials, and the Socialist movement in Europe is the same-- either young folks or older folks, no Xers.

Both Boomers and Millennials are overrepresented in the online discourse, bc one group has lots of time and one group has lots of skills. Xers are underrepresented.

This has allowed the extremes to disproportionately drive the discourse.

This has worked out OK for Republicans, bc they are ultrapartisan, and vote in lockstep even if they have to hold their nose-- but it is NOT going to work for Democrats. We are tribal, too, but on a much smaller scale.

Tons of Dems held their nose and voted for Hillary, but i believe even more Republicans were holding their nose for Trump.

That is why we're screwed. Republicans can elect a hold-your-nose candidate. Dems can't.

Many of us who were Boomer activists, observed in the '80s that Gen X had dropped the Left political baton, not wanting to be active. Some tried to analyze this apathy. One of the prevailing theories was that Gen X had seen how much energy their parents had put out with mixed results, and did not wish to "waste" their energy.

dark_crystal 03-20-2019 07:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cathexis (Post 1243073)
Many of us who were Boomer activists, observed in the '80s that Gen X had dropped the Left political baton, not wanting to be active. Some tried to analyze this apathy. One of the prevailing theories was that Gen X had seen how much energy their parents had put out with mixed results, and did not wish to "waste" their energy.

The boomers dropped the baton when they turned into yuppies.

Gen X saw all the hippies turn hypocrite and then a whole bunch of hippie parents chose their kids' childhood as a time to "find themselves," embracing divorce like sliced bread.

The generation that said "never trust anyone under 30" turned 40 while we were watching and it wasn't pretty.

Martina 03-20-2019 12:24 PM

I'm a boomer, and my friends are all teachers, social workers, admins at colleges, plus an under employed architect and an MPH who works construction. I have one friend in tech, so there's an exception. She makes a ton of money, but never seems to have a dime. Living in the Bay Area, I guess.

We never became real yuppies IMO. We never owned McMansions or bought new cars or valued that stuff. Good thing. We could not have afforded it.

We swim at public pools and go camping for vacations. I do think everyone has taken their kids to Europe once or twice, which is a privilege lots of folk do not have. People in my circle found work arounds for paying for their kids' college. Two of them got work at colleges so their kids could get free tuition. Two families relied on grandparents to help fund it. One was poor enough that her kids got good financial aid. That's it. The rest of us don't have kids.

My point is not all boomers became yuppies. Most of my friends did things like devoting huge amounts of time to their food coops or la leche league or slightly alternative institutions.

I do have connections, friends of friends, who did the yuppie transformation. They became lawyers, and after ten years at the ACLU or being a public defender, took a job at a firm and made serious money. Probably the most politically radical guy from my graduate school ended up at Harvard Law and then afterwards became a labor lawyer who helps big corporations fight discrimination lawsuits. What was that? A brain transplant? Actually he was originally from wealth. None of the rest of my friends were. One had lawyer parents but they grew up poor.

I am very wary of the entrenched upper middle class. They will do whatever it takes to keep their status, and they seem very anxious about it. I had an acquaintance, a lawyer, who didn't have a generous bone in his body. He ripped his ex-wife off in a divorce settlement. His lawyer daughter was the same. She lied on a mortgage application, which could have gotten her disbarred, to save a few bucks. One of his kids made a shitload of money in software, but didn't help another sister when she was transitioning out of a relationship. When my acquaintance's house got robbed, and his insurance didn't cover an expensive bike, his family members all made him feel like a fool. Right after he got robbed. Lovely people.

From my point of view, yuppies are a different breed. I know that a lot of people in my circle are relatively privileged. Home owners, health insurance, etc. But that is not the same as being wealth and status obsessed.

cathexis 03-20-2019 09:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dark_crystal (Post 1243091)
The boomers dropped the baton when they turned into yuppies.

Gen X saw all the hippies turn hypocrite and then a whole bunch of hippie parents chose their kids' childhood as a time to "find themselves," embracing divorce like sliced bread.

The generation that said "never trust anyone under 30" turned 40 while we were watching and it wasn't pretty.

Perhaps, some Boomers turned into yuppies. Folks I went to college with did so on full financial aid (tuition, books, fees, housing) with part-time jobs in the evening and weekend hours. We still found time to protest the Vietnam Conflict, attempt to get the E.R.A. passed, work with NARAL for women's right to choose, participate in actions for racial equality, and other causes that needed help.

Very few of the people I went to school with, were able to buy houses or have a stock portfolio. We lived in rehabbed areas of cities with used or given furniture. Yes, I had 7 bookcases in my place, but they were of the sort bought at Wal-mart and assembled with a screwdriver and 2 friends.
I rode a bike most places, if I didn't ride the bus on my discounted bus pass.
Worked my tail off for a double degree, Marxist Studies/Political Philosophy and Professional Nursing at the same time.

I have known several months of homelessness, not knowing where an open couch would be or how we would get something to eat. Have spent many a day panhandling at the end of freeway exits for food or a bed. Lived in a homeless shelter for a month, and had to make "midnight moves" to leave apartment to avoid court eviction leaving a majority of my belongings behind. This is just a sample of one Boomer. I have several friends with similar stories. Most of us were not well off, and did not live a privileged life.

We did; however, make a difference and improve the lives of who we could.

dark_crystal 03-22-2019 08:13 AM

I spent the 90s clerking in bookstores, record shops, and coffeehouses-- while attending art school. I met TONS of aging hippies. The women were cool. The men were universally pervs.

"Hippies and Yuppies are two different groups" coming from Boomers is awfully similar to the "we never lived in the South" language that lets white people claim they can't be complicit in white supremacy.

Boomers cannot freeze their legacy at the 60s. Gen X met the baby boom in the 70s and 80s.

Generation X As children and adolescents
Demographers William Strauss and Neil Howe, who authored several books on generations, including the 1993 book specifically on Generation X 13th Gen: Abort, Retry, Ignore, Fail?, reported that Gen Xers were children at a time when society was less focused on children and more focused on adults. Gen Xers were children during a time of increasing divorce rates, with divorce rates doubling in the mid-1960s, before peaking in 1980.

Strauss and Howe described a cultural shift where the long-held societal value of staying together for the sake of the children was replaced with a societal value of parental and individual self-actualization. Strauss wrote that society "moved from what Leslie Fiedler called a 1950s-era 'cult of the child' to what Landon Jones called a 1970s-era 'cult of the adult'."
The "Me" generation
The "Me" generation in the United States is a term referring to the baby boomers generation and the self-involved qualities that some people associate with it. The 1970s were dubbed the "Me" decade by writer Tom Wolfe; Christopher Lasch was another writer who commented on the rise of a culture of narcissism among the younger generation of that era. The phrase caught on with the general public, at a time when "self-realization" and "self-fulfillment" were becoming cultural aspirations to which young people supposedly ascribed higher importance than social responsibility.

The cultural change in the United States during the 1970s that was experienced by the baby boomers is complex. The 1960s are remembered as a time of political protests, radical experimentation with new cultural experiences (the Sexual Revolution, happenings, mainstream awareness of Eastern religions). The Civil Rights Movement gave rebellious young people serious goals to work towards. Cultural experimentation was justified as being directed toward spiritual or intellectual enlightenment. The mid to late 1970s, in contrast, were a time of increased economic crisis and disillusionment with idealistic politics among the young, particularly after the resignation of Richard Nixon and the end of the Vietnam War. Unapologetic hedonism became acceptable among the young, expressed in the Disco music popular at the time.

The new introspectiveness announced the demise of an established set of traditional faiths centred on work and the postponement of gratification, and the emergence of a consumption-oriented lifestyle ethic centred on lived experience and the immediacy of daily lifestyle choices.

By the mid-1970s, Tom Wolfe and Christopher Lasch were speaking out critically against the culture of narcissism. These criticisms were widely repeated throughout American popular media.

The 1970s have been described as a transitional era when the self-help of the 1960s became self-gratification, and eventually devolved into the selfishness of the 1980s
The Me Decade was toxic as hell, and the hippies are implicated, i'm sorry.

Xers are never going to remember the Boom the way the Boom remember themselves. We were there for the 70s. The 60s are a story.

We watch Millennials squaring off against the Boom, and-- while we are crossing our fingers for them-- we suspect they've underestimated just how ugly the response is going to be.

Like, the Millennials didn't watch an entire generation of their brothers die. Someone who came of age under Obama is going to have a different idea of what's possible than people growing up under Reagan-- who, I know, was not a Boomer, he would be 109 y/o by now.

But Rush Limbaugh was a Boomer, and that's what pushed me into activism. I was behind the counter when a flood of Boomers bought his first book, and wanted to tell me about it while they wrote their checks.

I was in ACT-UP, I was in the Lesbian Avengers, I was on Q-Patrol, I protested the Iraq War,
I spent the night before election day 1990(?) driving around Shreveport Louisiana, stealing David Duke signs out of people's yards.

Millennials know that the government killed a bunch of queers, but they did not watch it. The idea that the US could descend into theocracy is mostly hypothetical to them. Xers agree with Millennials' goals, but we have less confidence in the methods-- extremes make us nervous.

Like the girl who confronted Chelsea Clinton at the memorial last week. She was wearing a Bernie shirt. That makes this Xer nervous.

Martina 03-22-2019 10:13 AM

I'm a late boomer, born 1958. I certainly saw a generation die.

My friends who had kids conformed to another stereotype, suddenly becoming serious householders, super concerned with their kids and being good parents. Of the friends I've known for thirty plus years, none of those who married got divorced. One, a gay male without kids, really needs to. I think my experience is a little different.

kittygrrl 03-22-2019 03:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cathexis (Post 1243145)
Perhaps, some Boomers turned into yuppies. Folks I went to college with did so on full financial aid (tuition, books, fees, housing) with part-time jobs in the evening and weekend hours. We still found time to protest the Vietnam Conflict, attempt to get the E.R.A. passed, work with NARAL for women's right to choose, participate in actions for racial equality, and other causes that needed help.

Very few of the people I went to school with, were able to buy houses or have a stock portfolio. We lived in rehabbed areas of cities with used or given furniture. Yes, I had 7 bookcases in my place, but they were of the sort bought at Wal-mart and assembled with a screwdriver and 2 friends.
I rode a bike most places, if I didn't ride the bus on my discounted bus pass.
Worked my tail off for a double degree, Marxist Studies/Political Philosophy and Professional Nursing at the same time.

I have known several months of homelessness, not knowing where an open couch would be or how we would get something to eat. Have spent many a day panhandling at the end of freeway exits for food or a bed. Lived in a homeless shelter for a month, and had to make "midnight moves" to leave apartment to avoid court eviction leaving a majority of my belongings behind. This is just a sample of one Boomer. I have several friends with similar stories. Most of us were not well off, and did not live a privileged life.

We did; however, make a difference and improve the lives of who we could.

quite a story cat..so interesting

dark_crystal 03-25-2019 08:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Martina (Post 1243218)
I'm a late boomer, born 1958. I certainly saw a generation die.

My friends who had kids conformed to another stereotype, suddenly becoming serious householders, super concerned with their kids and being good parents. Of the friends I've known for thirty plus years, none of those who married got divorced. One, a gay male without kids, really needs to. I think my experience is a little different.

My partner was born in 1961. She does not seem like a boomer to me at all.

Ya'll are in Generation Jones
Generation Jones is the social cohort of the latter half of the Baby boomers to the first years of Generation X. The term was first coined by the cultural commentator Jonathan Pontell, who identified the cohort as those born from 1954 to 1965 in the U.S. who came of age during the oil crisis, stagflation, and the Carter presidency, rather than during the 1960s, but slightly before Gen X. Other sources place the starting point at 1956 or 1957. Unlike older baby boomers, most of Generation Jones did not grow up with World War II veterans as fathers, and for them there was no compulsory military service and no defining political cause, as opposition to United States involvement in the Vietnam War had been for the older boomers.

The name "Generation Jones" has several connotations, including a large anonymous generation, a "keeping up with the Joneses" competitiveness and the slang word "jones" or "jonesing", meaning a yearning or craving. It is believed that Jonesers were given huge expectations as children in the 1960s, and then confronted with a different reality as they came of age during a long period of mass unemployment and when de-industrialization arrived full force in the mid-late 1970s and 1980s, leaving them with a certain unrequited "jonesing" quality for the more prosperous days of the past.

The generation is noted for coming of age after a huge swath of their older brothers and sisters in the earlier portion of the baby boomer population had come immediately preceding them; thus, many complain that there was a paucity of resources and privileges available to them that were seemingly abundant to older boomers. Therefore, there is a certain level of bitterness and "jonesing" for the level of freedom and affluence granted to older boomers but denied to them
My parents are Silent Generation (born '39 and '43, married late and did not have me until 1970, when dad was 31 and back from 2 deployments)

I recently found a book about the Silents called The Lucky Few: Between the Greatest Generation and the Baby Boom.
Born during the Great Depression and World War Two (1929 – 1945) - between the Greatest Generation and the Baby Boom - an entire generation has slipped between the cracks of history. Yet behind the scenes, these Lucky Few became the first American generation smaller than the one before them, and the luckiest generation of Americans ever.

As children they experienced the most stable intact parental families in the nation’s history. Lucky Few women married earlier than any other generation of the century and helped give birth to the Baby Boom, yet also gained in education compared to earlier generations. Lucky Few men made the greatest gains of the century in schooling, earned veterans benefits like the Greatest Generation but served mostly in peacetime with only a fraction of the casualties, came closest to full employment, and spearheaded the trend toward earlier retirement.

More than any other generation, Lucky Few men advanced into professional and white-collar jobs while Lucky Few women concentrated in the clerical "pink-collar ghetto." Even in retirement and old age the Lucky Few remain in the right place at the right time. Here is their story, and the story of how they have affected other recent generations of Americans before and since.
These folks are ages 70-90 now. They are ALLLLLLLL Republicans at this point, it seems. These are the people Republicans were going for with the Southern Strategy. Lucky Few and Greatest Generation people who were Democrats peeled off when the Dems blew off the unions.

Anyway, this particular digression was about generational fractures among anti-Trump voters.

I say "anti-Trump" because today it does not feel useful to talk about Democrats. The candidate who runs against Trump will need to understand that we are building a coalition of Republican defectors (optimism), moderates, centrists, liberals, progressives, socialists, and leftists.

Only about half of those find "beat Trump" to be sufficient motivation. The other half want a revolution. The moderates, centrists, and liberals keep yelling at everybody else about how to beat Trump and not understanding why they don't seem terrified by the possibility of another 4 years.

I think that is our generational issue-- older moderates/centrists/liberals (plus most minorities of all ages) are terrified of a Trump win and prioritize beating him above all else.

Progressives, Socialists, and Leftists aren't motivated by the fear of another 4 years. They want a candidate who beats Trump on the way to changing the world.

To me, that's Bernie. The media has successfully ghettoized him as appealing only to white Millennials, though. His path to the nomination has to get him out of that ghetto.

kittygrrl 03-25-2019 08:31 AM

it's a good sign...news commentators are pronouncing mayor Pete's last name better...he has a good sense of humor about it..i really wish he had a chance...i think he is the best kind of person..there are others of course, but his light is the brightest..to me

dark_crystal 03-25-2019 08:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kittygrrl (Post 1243354)
it's a good sign...news commentators are pronouncing mayor Pete's last name better...he has a good sense of humor about it..i really wish he had a chance...i think he is the best kind of person..there are others of course, but his light is the brightest..to me

There has been a two-week Mayor Pete honeymoon but i predict it stalls starting either today or tomorrow, based on comments to his social media.

The progressives don't like his immigration, foreign policy, and NatSec/Manning/Snowden stances and the Hillary voters are starting to complain about sexism in his media coverage vs Warren's.

Warren is not going to make it because her hair color is too close to Hillary's. I am serious.

MsTinkerbelly 03-25-2019 09:15 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dark_crystal (Post 1243356)
There has been a two-week Mayor Pete honeymoon but i predict it stalls starting either today or tomorrow, based on comments to his social media.

The progressives don't like his immigration, foreign policy, and NatSec/Manning/Snowden stances and the Hillary voters are starting to complain about sexism in his media coverage vs Warren's.

Warren is not going to make it because her hair color is too close to Hillary's. I am serious.

I cannot stand to hear Warren speak, and that other blonde woman running (can’t even remember her name), needs get some confidence and speak up! Do you suppose I (we) are so used to male politicians, that we hear a female voice and we want to slap someone? Hilary’s voice was like nails on a chalk board...but, I “hear” Kamala and Amy without cringing, soooooooooo?

Why is it that hair color/style and voices matter so much when they belong to a woman? Are we conditioned to expect women to be “pretty” and in their “place”? Am I considered a sexist pig, or am I conditioned by society to see things in a slant toward men?

dark_crystal 03-25-2019 11:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MsTinkerbelly (Post 1243359)
I cannot stand to hear Warren speak, and that other blonde woman running (can’t even remember her name), needs get some confidence and speak up! Do you suppose I (we) are so used to male politicians, that we hear a female voice and we want to slap someone? Hilary’s voice was like nails on a chalk board...but, I “hear” Kamala and Amy without cringing, soooooooooo?

Why is it that hair color/style and voices matter so much when they belong to a woman? Are we conditioned to expect women to be “pretty” and in their “place”? Am I considered a sexist pig, or am I conditioned by society to see things in a slant toward men?

For me, the issue with Warren and Clinton is that i associate them with second-wave feminism, and i associate the second wave with a lot of negative stuff. The second wave sidelined lesbians and second-wave lesbians sidelined butch-femme.

PLUS i just feel like they all want us to be Diane Keaton from the Baby Boom, pre-baby.

C0LLETTE 03-25-2019 02:41 PM

Forgive me but could someone post a chart showing a different "Generation" title for every 2 years from 1945 to 2019. Would be most helpful .

And please don't forget to differentiate "early" and "late" within those 2 year slots.

Oh, and don't forget to mention to which Continent, Hemisphere, Country, State, Province. Time Zone you are attaching your heady analysis.

Don't know about you but I could have been a full-fledged "hippie"if only I hadn't let the fear of not finding a parking spot prevented me from going to Woodstock. That's how we "late" Baby Boomers roll.

Martina 03-25-2019 03:07 PM

I def want a candidate who will beat Trump on the way to changing the world. I think inequality and climate change are so extremely impinging on quality of life around the world that we can't keep waiting.

BUT, any Dem who can beat Trump will do. I am worn out and just can't take another four years of Trump.

BullDog 03-25-2019 05:29 PM

I haven't closely scrutinized the candidates but I do like Kamala Harris the best. However, I'm not sure this pathetic country will elect a woman or a person of color as president right now, let alone someone who is both. It would be nice if I were wrong.

I like Elizabeth Warren a lot but don't think she can get elected as president - again I would love to be wrong.

I can't stand Sanders and don't think he has any chance against Trump. If he switches over to being a Democrat just to run for president like he did last time (and then switched right back after he lost) and he won the "Democratic" nomination - yes, of course, I would vote for him. I would much rather have Harris or Warren. Warren is every bit as progressive as Sanders is but actually gets things done, can work with people, actually belongs to the Democratic party, and is way more consistent. It's not as if I don't like progressives.

I do have a friend who follows politics closely who thinks Joe Biden would have the best chance to beat Trump - white male with at least some blue color "cred" who can be sarcastic and up in the face of Trump and openly mock and laugh at him. She could very well be right.

Beto and the mayor are totally meh to me, but who knows. I want someone with more experience than that.

I don't know who has the best chance to beat Trump - another white male, battle of the testosterone - aka Biden - or someone completely different than Trump who maybe would throw him off - Kamala Harris? Something totally different than those two things?

I think America is in an ugly and cynical place and some sort of inspiring message of Hope and Change or the Bernie thing is not going to fly this time around. Then again, could be I'm the one that's a lot more cynical than the overall country. I don't want soaring inspirational messages or someone promising me things that are totally implausible. I want a responsible adult with experience who is actually capable of doing the job. But yes, most of all, beat Trump. Whoever that has to be.

Hopefully, enough people on the left-hand side will be inspired enough to at least go vote. Who knows what the next year and a half will bring.

BullDog 03-25-2019 07:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BullDog (Post 1243384)
I do have a friend who follows politics closely who thinks Joe Biden would have the best chance to beat Trump - white male with at least some blue color "cred" who can be sarcastic and up in the face of Trump and openly mock and laugh at him. She could very well be right

Sorry too late to edit. I mean blue collar - not color, lol. Although, go blue!

Kätzchen 03-26-2019 08:20 PM

What's on my mind tonight is that it's imperative for American's to dig in for a big fight to regain control of our government again. I just completed two VERY different types of intrusive Census Bureau forms (one online, one in paper form), and it's never been more obvious to me that we need to OCCUPY the living sh*t out of the fascist dictator-wanna-be's in charge of our government. I'm downright angry tonight that the census form in no way shape or form is designed to help allocate funding for social programs or for voting issues or anything useful it was formerly designed to do.

I've got time on my hands and I can see no better way to spend it that to join the ranks of other American's who won't put up with that lying POS in the WH or with the other's that person has appointed to destroy American democracy.

And, that's exactly what I think they are doing: Destroying our country and destroying every single landmark case on the books, so they can take over the country and run it into the ground.

I won't stand by and watch it go down like that.

I'm going to sink my energy into recovering our country and the democratic values that is supposed to support every person in our country, regardless of orientation, color, religious beliefs, etc. I am going to make it count, just like those before us who stood up and did something about it.


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