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Old 11-08-2017, 11:25 AM   #2885
Wrang1er
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I'm reading Jane of Austin by Hillary Manton Lodge. Jane of Austin offers readers a fresh and contemporary take on a beloved classic.

When driving I just started listening to Lincoln at the Bardo by George Saunders. I'm very excited about this one.

February 1862. The Civil War rages while President Lincoln's beloved eleven-year-old son is gravely ill. In a matter of days, Willie dies and is laid to rest in a Georgetown cemetery. Newspapers report that a grief-stricken Lincoln returns to the crypt several times alone to hold his boy's body.

From that seed of historical truth, George Saunders spins an unforgettable story of familial love and loss that breaks free of its realistic, historical framework into a thrilling, supernatural realm both hilarious and terrifying. Willie Lincoln finds himself in a strange purgatory -- called, in the Tibetan tradition, the bardo. Within this transitional state, where ghosts mingle, gripe, and commiserate, a monumental struggle erupts over young Willie's soul.
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