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Old 11-07-2017, 12:06 PM   #41
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This is becoming an opportunity wasted.

What is being uncovered is a very well known, well tolerated, very deliberate patterns of behavior that is enabled on so many levels and allowed through a conspiracy of silence.

People, in general, seem more titillated about who is going to come forward with what allegations against whom. People, in general, seem less concerned about the behavior itself and how it is used. Is this really an issue that should turn into tabloid fodder?

It doesnt matter to me how many victims Weinsten had or who those victims were. Same with Spacey or Hoffman or Cosby or anyone else.

What matters to me, is that for every predator uncovered, there are hundreds or thousands that remain in place. They are protected by the same system that was willing to give up or sacrifice Weinstein and others while they continue to protect those who have yet to be exposed.

I see a lot of action going on to expel people from guilds and academies and to fire them. That is damage control behavior, not change behavior.

Change behavior is when Jada Pickett Smith reamed the academy for the "lack of diversity". Suddenly, the academy is going to redo the membership to ensure there was more visible diversity, they were nominating films for awards that were on no one's lists, and these films were winning. As I write this, I'm thinking these actions might have been more placating than change oriented. But, it was still a deliberate change.

I am disappointed by some of the actresses who have come forward but been oddly verbal about their experiences. Angelina Jolie is a well known activist and very verbal about the causes that are near and dear to her. Her statement was very subdued.

Meryl Streep can rip Trump a new one without blinking and eye. But, on this issue, the best she has is "Hoffman grabbed my boob once"?

There is an actors union which has been strangely silent. The media isnt even asking them to weigh in. Hello?

What organizations to help women have picked up the ball and tried to run with it? None. Not a single one.

Where is NOW? Where are all these new feminist groups? Do you really think #metoo and social media's waning outrage is changing anything or sprurring any in your face activitists who will not let this be swept back under the rug?

Women who work in or used to work in Congress are coming forward. The Woman's Caucus is nowhere to be found.

Where is the ACLU? Or, maybe women as a whole, comprising over half the population dont have civil rights?

What message is this lack of action and activism sending to predators, victims, potential victims, and society at large?

There is a well known and well documented pedophile ring operating in the entertainment field. It is getting some minor attention in the press for the moment. Hello? Where are the sexual victim police units? Where are all those organizations formed to protect children from sexual exploitation?

I was happy to see the article ks posted about the same types of behaviors occurring in lesbian/queer communities. I wish I could say I was surprised to learn the author didnt have a clue this happened in her own community. Maybe in a few years, when she has more experience, finds a voice, understands the many many ways in which this behavior is shown, experienced, and tolerated, she will write another article about how the community reacted to her when she spoke to the reality.

Thank you for this articulate and astute observation Kobi.


In my case, it turned out to be two people in my family, two unrelated incidents with two separate pastors, and in most cases, people who sexually assaulted me were thought of as good hearted people, people you'd never expect in a million years of committing such egregious behaviors.

The mask that these "good hearted" people hide behind is the mask of the social standing in communities, which makes it even harder to Speak out about sexual harassment perpetrated upon the victim (myself and/or others).

I also think it's hard for people to really wrap their minds around the fact that "good hearted" people in ANY community or social groups are guilty of sexual harassment....which makes it all the harder for victims to press charges or speak out about such insidious crimes committed against other human beings.

Thanks for your personal commentary on sexual assault.

I appreciate your ability to grasp the scope and nature of this particular crime.
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Old 11-07-2017, 05:54 PM   #42
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Originally Posted by Kobi View Post

This is becoming an opportunity wasted.

What is being uncovered is a very well known, well tolerated, very deliberate patterns of behavior that is enabled on so many levels and allowed through a conspiracy of silence.

People, in general, seem more titillated about who is going to come forward with what allegations against whom. People, in general, seem less concerned about the behavior itself and how it is used. Is this really an issue that should turn into tabloid fodder?
I think when you say "people" you should really be saying "the media." Because we are only able to know what is being said and done through what is being reported.

OF COURSE they are going to going to go for gossip and titillation-- you have to assume that the men who run every media organization have closets full of exactly these same type of skeletons. They are not going to present this coverage as anything more than a train wreck to gawk at.

This is why the Kevin Spacey story has been covered so disproportionately (IMHO) to the 9 other non-Weinstein straight men who were also busted this month-- it is extra bad, but the same-sex aspect opens a whole different channel, one step removed from the editors who are desperately hoping we'll look in that direction and not theirs.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kobi View Post

I am disappointed by some of the actresses who have come forward but been oddly verbal about their experiences. Angelina Jolie is a well known activist and very verbal about the causes that are near and dear to her. Her statement was very subdued.

Meryl Streep can rip Trump a new one without blinking and eye. But, on this issue, the best she has is "Hoffman grabbed my boob once"?


I thought we were all on board with the idea of letting women find their own comfort level when and if they decide to share their story.
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Old 11-07-2017, 06:50 PM   #43
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I am disappointed by some of the actresses who have come forward but been oddly verbal about their experiences. Angelina Jolie is a well known activist and very verbal about the causes that are near and dear to her. Her statement was very subdued.

Meryl Streep can rip Trump a new one without blinking and eye. But, on this issue, the best she has is "Hoffman grabbed my boob once"?




Kobi i am really shocked at this. Do you not realize that "cutting 45 a new one" and speaking about being personally sexually assaulted are not even in the same Universe ?




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Old 11-07-2017, 06:52 PM   #44
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Kobi i am really shocked at this. Do you not realize that "cutting 45 a new one" and speaking about being personally sexually assaulted are not even in the same Universe ?




My gut reaction is, since when did women owe the world their stories?
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Old 11-07-2017, 09:02 PM   #45
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I think when you say "people" you should really be saying "the media." Because we are only able to know what is being said and done through what is being reported.

OF COURSE they are going to going to go for gossip and titillation-- you have to assume that the men who run every media organization have closets full of exactly these same type of skeletons. They are not going to present this coverage as anything more than a train wreck to gawk at.

This is why the Kevin Spacey story has been covered so disproportionately (IMHO) to the 9 other non-Weinstein straight men who were also busted this month-- it is extra bad, but the same-sex aspect opens a whole different channel, one step removed from the editors who are desperately hoping we'll look in that direction and not theirs.

That is an interesting point. I do believe the media operates in such a way as to skew perceptions which in turn skews our understanding as well as our discussions - personal, private and public ones.

As consumers of the media, it is also our choice as to how we interpret things. It is also our choice to question what is being presented, how it is being presented, and why. The media is a tool. What we do with that tool is up to us as people. That has been my point through all my posts.

It is also up to us - as consumers and individual people to pick what it is we choose to focus on in our day to day interactions and discussions. The choices are endless. Do we choose to discuss the realities of sexual assault? Do we seek to enlighten ourselves as to what sexual harassment really means and what it looks like? Do we focus on individual stories? Do we see the bigger picture these stories represent? Do we see common themes across industries? Or, do we choose to keep something a different level?




Quote:
I thought we were all on board with the idea of letting women find their own comfort level when and if they decide to share their story.

I dont understand what this has to do with what I said. I put things in certain contexts to communicate overall ideas. If the specifics are taken out of context, the meaning is lost.
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Old 11-07-2017, 09:12 PM   #46
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Kobi i am really shocked at this. Do you not realize that "cutting 45 a new one" and speaking about being personally sexually assaulted are not even in the same Universe ?


When something is taken out of context, the meaning is lost. It can then be mistaken to be something that was never said.

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Old 11-09-2017, 09:15 AM   #47
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The strength and the greatness of Diana Nyad in written form.


Diana Nyad: My Life After Sexual Assault



Here I was, a strong-willed young athlete. There he was, a charismatic pillar of the community. But I'm the one who, all these many years later, at the age of 68, no matter how happy and together I may be, continues to deal with the rage and the shame that comes with being silenced.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/09/o...=fb-share&_r=0

** This article is very graphic, must have been quite cathartic for her to share what happened all those many years ago.
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Old 11-30-2017, 12:10 PM   #48
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Default She Didn’t Fight Back: 5 (Misguided) Reasons People Doubt Sexual Misconduct Victims

She Didn’t Fight Back: 5 (Misguided) Reasons People Doubt Sexual Misconduct Victims

By SHAILA DEWANNOV. 30, 2017

She took decades to come forward. She can’t remember exactly what happened. She sent friendly text messages to the same man she says assaulted her. She didn’t fight back.

There are all sorts of reasons women who report sexual misconduct, from unwanted advances by their bosses to groping or forced sex acts, are not believed, and with a steady drumbeat of new reports making headlines, the country is hearing a lot of them.

But some of the most commonly raised causes for doubt, like a long delay in reporting or a foggy recall of events, are the very hallmarks that experts say they would expect to see after a sexual assault.

“There’s something really unique about sexual assault in the way we think about it, which is pretty upside down from the way it actually operates,” said Kimberly A. Lonsway, a psychologist who conducts law enforcement training on sexual assault as the research director of End Violence Against Women International. “In so many instances when there’s something that is characteristic of assault, it causes us to doubt it.”

Partly this is because of widespread misconceptions. The public and the police vastly overestimate the incidence of false reports: The most solid, case-by-case examinations say that only 5 to 7 percent of sexual assault reports are false. Responses to trauma that are often viewed as evidence of unreliability, such as paralysis or an inability to recall timelines, have been shown by neurobiological research to be not only legitimate, but common. And when it comes to the most serious assaults, like rape, people imagine that they are committed by strangers who attack in a dark alley, and base their view of how victims should react on that idea — even though the vast majority of assaults occur between people who know one another.

Many of the same credibility issues surround reports of sexual harassment involving advances made by a boss or someone in a position of power over the victim.

Of course, not every allegation is true. The credibility of those who report sexual misconduct, experts say, should be evaluated by looking for corroborating evidence or using relevant parts of accusers’ backgrounds, like whether they have habitually misrepresented the truth in the past.

But experts say that because many people are not psychologically prepared to accept how prevalent harassment and assault are, they tend to look for reasons to disbelieve. For example, offenders are more likely to choose victims who have been previously assaulted, statistics show, but a woman who reports more than one assault is less likely to be believed.

Here is a look at some of the misconceptions that come up again and again when assessing whether a victim’s account is true.

The victim doesn’t act like one.


(Edward Martins, left, and Richard Hall, center, former New York Police Department detectives, were accused of raping a woman in a police van. Credit Dave Sanders for The New York Times)

A young woman said she was raped in a police van by two New York City officers, Eddie Martins and Richard Hall, in September. Their lawyers have accused the woman, who is 18, of posting “provocative” selfies and bragging about news media attention and the millions of dollars she expects to win in a civil case.

“This behavior is unprecedented for a depressed victim of a vicious rape,” the lawyers wrote, according to The New York Post.

But victims behave in a wide variety of ways.

There is no one response to sexual assault. A trauma victim can as easily appear calm or flat as distraught or overtly angry.

Later, they may react by self-medicating, by engaging in high-risk sexual behavior, by withdrawing from those around them or by attempting to regain control. Some child victims initiate sexual abuse, experts say, just so they can predict when it is coming.

It is no surprise that a teenager conditioned to use “likes” as a measure of self-esteem would turn to social media to deal with post-traumatic stress, said Veronique Valliere, a psychologist who counsels sexual assault perpetrators and victims and consults with the military and law enforcement.

“That’s a pretty normal reaction to helplessness and terror,” she added. “It doesn’t mean that she doesn’t have PTSD, it means she thinks this is the way she’s going to be protected. This is the way she’s going to regain control.”

She stayed friendly with her abuser.


(Harvey Weinstein at the Cannes Film Festival in 2015. Credit Bertrand Langlois/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images )

Some of the women who say Harvey Weinstein groped or assaulted them kept in contact with him afterward, saying that good relations with such a powerful player in the entertainment industry were a must for their careers. After the allegations against Mr. Weinstein were published in The New York Times, one of his advisers at the time, Lisa Bloom, sent an email to the directors of the Weinstein Company, outlining a plan that included the release of “photos of several of the accusers in very friendly poses with Harvey after his alleged misconduct.”

Offenders work assiduously to gain trust and appear benevolent, and that relationship does not disappear overnight, even after an abusive episode. Women in particular, experts point out, are conditioned to smooth things over.

“Victims think that it was their fault, so in many cases they want continued contact,” said Roderick MacLeish, a Boston lawyer who has represented hundreds of victims of abuse by Catholic priests and schoolteachers. “And then later they realize that it was for the perpetrator’s sexual gratification, and that’s devastating.”

The victim may have little choice but to stay in contact if the offender is a boss, teacher, coach or relative.

Victims also distinguish between what is safe — taking a photo with Mr. Weinstein in public at an awards ceremony, for example — and what they must avoid, such as going to his hotel room alone.

She did not come forward right away.


(Leigh Corfman, who has accused Roy S. Moore, a Senate candidate in Alabama, appeared on NBC’s “Today” show. Credit NBC News TODAY, via Associated Press)

Leigh Corfman recently said that the Republican candidate for Senate in Alabama, Roy S. Moore, sexually assaulted her when she was 14, nearly four decades ago. She said she worried for years that going public would affect her children, and that her history of divorce and financial mistakes would undermine her account. After being approached by a Washington Post reporter, she agreed to tell her story, and later said, “If anything, this has cost me.”

But negative consequences are not the only thing to keep victims from coming forward. Experts point to a more fundamental issue: When the perpetrator is someone they trusted, it can take years for victims even to identify what happened to them as a violation.

Reah Bravo, one of several woman who say that the broadcast journalist Charlie Rose made unwanted sexual advances while they were working for him, told The Washington Post, “It has taken 10 years and a fierce moment of cultural reckoning for me to understand these moments for what they were.”

Scott Berkowitz, the president of RAINN, the Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network, said confusion and self-blame are common: “A lot of people who call the national hotline, one of the first questions they ask is, ‘Was I raped?’ ”

Offenders encourage confusion and shame and exploit people’s reluctance to identify themselves as victims. Ms. Valliere said the offenders she treats list two main tactics they use to obscure assaults: They camouflage the act as horseplay or humor, or they act as though nothing happened.

“If they do this enough, the victim can get really confused, like they’re really the bad one for thinking badly about the offender,” she said.

Her story does not add up.


(Andrea Constand at the Montgomery County Courthouse in Norristown, Pa., during Bill Cosby’s sexual assault trial in June. Credit Pool photo by Matt Rourke)

Andrea Constand, whose complaint that Bill Cosby drugged and raped her resulted in a criminal trial more than a decade later, was questioned on many fronts. One was discrepancies in her statements about when the assaults occurred. Mr. Cosby said the sex was consensual, and the trial ended in a hung jury.

Similarly, Mr. Moore’s Senate campaign has questioned details in the story of Beverly Nelson, who said Mr. Moore forcibly groped her in a car in the late 1970s. They said she was wrong about details like what time the restaurant where they met closed and whether there were Dumpsters in back of the restaurant or on the side.

Not only does memory fade with time, but when the brain’s fear circuitry is activated, the prefrontal cortex where details like sequence and locations are recorded tends to recede, while the part of the brain that records sensory memories kicks in. Victims may vividly remember a wallpaper pattern or a scent, but not the order of events.

Rebecca Campbell, a psychologist at Michigan State University who has studied the institutional response to sexual assault victims, compares the memory of a survivor to hundreds of tiny notes that are scattered across a desk. The bits of information are accurate, but disordered and incomplete. Yet the first questions asked of victims are often who, what, when and where.

She didn’t fight back.

When people are mugged or robbed, they are not asked why they did not resist.

But in sexual assault cases, failure to resist can be one of the biggest sticking points for jurors. Often both sides acknowledge that a sex act occurred, and the question is whether it was consensual. Fighting back is viewed as an easy litmus test. But women are conditioned not to use violence.

Men and women both tend to compare a victim’s actions with what they think they themselves would have done in a similar situation, and research shows that their imagined response usually involves aggressive resistance — even when the attacker is larger and stronger. “In their heads, suddenly they know kung fu,” Ms. Valliere said.

Neurobiological research has shown that the so-called fight-or-flight response to danger would more accurately be called “fight, flight or freeze.” And even after that initial response, victims can be rendered involuntarily immobile, becoming either paralyzed or limp as a result of the brain and body’s protective response.

Even so, the victim faces scrutiny of her failure to resist, and of every decision she made before, during and after the ordeal. To contrast sexual assault with other types of crime, Ms. Valliere said, she often shows a photograph of the Boston Marathon bombing. “We never said to the victims, ‘Why were you in that marathon, why did you put yourself in that position, why didn’t you run faster, why didn’t you run slower?’

“But when it comes to a victim of interpersonal violence,” she added, “we think there’s a way they should act.”
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Old 12-06-2017, 04:43 PM   #49
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Old 12-12-2017, 05:03 PM   #50
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How useless and even dangerous it is to go to HR

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/12/b...rces.html?_r=0
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Old 12-12-2017, 07:03 PM   #51
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Today at PT, I finally got to read excerpts from the TIME magazine article about women who were nominated as this year's group of women speaking out about sexual harassment in the workplace or being sexually assaulted.

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Originally Posted by TIME
Professors Celeste Kidd and Jessica Cantlon, along with six other current and former members of the brain and cognitive sciences department (University of Rochester NY), filed complaints with the university and the EEOC alleging harassment and retaliation.

"If they could stop us from talking, the we're going to stop everyone from listening," says Cantlon. "The administration went into our emails to try to find pieces of material that they could use to embarrass us or try to make other faculty members angry with us. But eight of us linked arms and continued to pursue the complaint. I think working together was powerful. It was hard to silence us," -- Jessica Cantlon.

While Kidd & Cantlon's story was featured in the TIME magazine edition last week, their breaking news story was published in full by The New York Times in the September 15th 2017 publication. See link to full story below :

https://mobile.nytimes.com/2017/09/1....html?referer=
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Old 12-16-2017, 06:01 PM   #52
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Default Major media players start commission for sexual misconduct

The biggest figures and institutions in entertainment have established a commission to be chaired by Anita Hill that intends to combat sexual misconduct and inequality in the industry in the wake of the huge wave of revelations spurred by allegations against Harvey Weinstein.

A statement Friday announced the founding of the Commission on Sexual Harassment and Advancing Equality in the Workplace, a group that grew out of a meeting called by "Star Wars" producer Kathleen Kennedy and several other prominent women in the industry.

"The Commission will not seek just one solution, but a comprehensive strategy to address the complex and interrelated causes of the problems of parity and power," Kennedy said in a statement.

The chief executives of nearly every major Hollywood studio, TV network and record label attended the meeting and agreed to found and to fund the group, the statement said. The long list includes Disney CEO Bob Iger, Paramount CEO Karen Stuart, Universal Music Group CEO Sir Lucian Grainge and CBS chief executive Leslie Moonves.

The movie and music academies and many of the major agencies and unions that represent entertainers also signed on.

The group chose as its chair the law professor Hill, who brought the concept of sexual harassment to national consciousness in 1991 when she testified during the Supreme Court confirmation hearings of Clarence Thomas.

"It is time to end the culture of silence," Hill said in a statement. "I've been at this work for 26 years. This moment presents us with an unprecedented opportunity to make real change."

The commission said in its statement that it would reconvene immediately after the first of the year to hone its mission, scope and priorities.

The revelations about Weinstein in The New York Times and the New Yorker in October have brought on two months unlike any the media world has ever seen, with nearly daily allegations of sexual harassment assault and abuse involving some of the most prominent players in entertainment including Kevin Spacey, Louis CK, Dustin Hoffman and Russell Simmons.

Hill has been making appearances in Southern California in recent days before Friday's announcement, speaking to a gathering of entertainers and executives in Beverly Hills last week.

She said there that she knew that despite Thomas' confirmation to the Supreme Court, the issue would one day return.

https://www.yahoo.com/news/major-med...043412498.html

----------------------------

This is what I have been waiting to see.


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Old 12-16-2017, 06:35 PM   #53
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Old 12-17-2017, 10:07 AM   #54
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Default Bipartisan Group of Senators Introduce Legislation to Reform Sexual Harassment Investigations in Congress

A bipartisan senate group introduced new legislation to reform the processes by which sexual harassment investigations involving members of Congress are conducted.

The Congressional Harassment Reform Act — backed by 20 senators both Republican and Democrat — would change the reporting process for victims, end the process’s strict secrecy rules and require lawmakers to pay settlements out of their own pocket rather than taxpayer money.

The bill was supported by U.S. Senators Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY), Ted Cruz (R-TX), Joni Ernst (R-IA), Dianne Feinstein (D-CA), Lisa Murkowski (R-AK), Lindsey Graham (R-SC), John Cornyn (R-TX), Claire McCaskill (D-MO), Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH), Rob Portman (R-OH), Richard Blumenthal (D-CT), Tammy Baldwin (D-WI), Mazie Hirono (D-HI), Elizabeth Warren (D-MA), Cory Booker (D-NJ), Cory Gardner (R-CO), Dan Sullivan (R-AK), Maggie Hassan (D-NH), Kamala Harris (D-CA), and Catherine Cortez Masto (D-NV).

“Congress should never be above the law or play by their own set of rules,” Gillibrand said in a statement. “We must ensure that Congress handles complaints to create an environment where staffers can come forward if something happens to them without having to fear that it will ruin their careers. This bipartisan legislation would bring us much closer to that goal.”

The new legislation comes after a number of members of Congress have stepped down or announced plans to resign amid sexual misconduct scandals. Al Franken resigned last week after multiple women accused him of inappropriate contact. John Conyers of Michigan also resigned after sexual harassment allegations, as did Arizona representative Trent Franks, after it was revealed he asked former staffers to serve as a surrogate. Blake Farenthold and Joe Barton, both of Texas, said they would not seek another term.

https://www.thewrap.com/bipartisan-g...s-in-congress/

-----------------------------------


This is a bit of an improvement. The Congressional Page scandal back in the 1980's managed to, as far as we know at the moment, keep teenage pages safe from preying adult congressmen. This might help except I cannot find the specifics that will make reporting easier and safer.
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Old 12-17-2017, 10:23 AM   #55
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Default In sex assault laws, definition of consent varies widely

JOCELYN NOVECK
,Associated Press•December 16, 2017

For two months now, as accusations of sexual misconduct have piled up against Harvey Weinstein, the disgraced mogul has responded over and over again: "Any allegations of nonconsensual sex are unequivocally denied."

Consent is a concept central to law on sexual assault, and will likely be an issue in potential legal cases against Weinstein, who is under investigation by police in four cities, and others accused in the current so-called "reckoning."

But the definition of consent — namely, how it is expressed — is a matter of intense debate: Is it a definite "yes," or the mere absence of "no"? Can it be revoked? Do power dynamics come into play? Legally, the definition varies widely across the nation.

"Half the states don't even have a definition of consent," says Erin Murphy, a professor at New York University School of Law who's involved in a project to rewrite a model penal code on sex assault. "One person's idea of consent is that no one is screaming or crying. Another person's idea of consent is someone saying, 'Yes, I want to do this.' And in between, of course, is an enormous spectrum of behavior, both verbal and nonverbal, that people engage in to communicate desire or lack of desire."

"It's pretty telling," Murphy adds, "that the critical thing most people look to understand the nature of a sexual encounter — this idea of consent — is one that we don't even have a consensus definition of in our society."

Many victim advocates argue that a power imbalance plays a role. In nearly every instance, the allegations in recent weeks came from accusers who were in far less powerful positions than those they accused — as in, for example, the rape allegations that have surfaced against music mogul Russell Simmons, which he denies.

"You have to look at the power dynamics, the coercion, the manipulation," says Jeanie Kurka Reimer, a longtime advocate in the area of sexual assault. "The threatening and grooming that perpetrators use to create confusion and compliance and fear in the minds of the victims. Just going along with something does not mean consent."

Many Weinstein accusers have spoken about that uneven dynamic. For years Weinstein was one of the most powerful men in Hollywood, and most of his alleged victims were women in their 20s, looking for their first big break. A number have indicated that his power — and fear of his retribution, both professional and physical — blunted their ability to resist his advances. Actress Paz de la Huerta, who has accused Weinstein of rape, said in a TV interview: "I just froze in fear. I guess that would be considered rape, because I didn't want to do it."

One woman who did manage to escape Weinstein's advances in a 2014 hotel-room encounter addressed the power imbalance in a recent essay. The very word "consent," actress and writer Brit Marling wrote in the Atlantic, "cannot fully capture the complexity of the encounter. Because consent is a function of power. You have to have a modicum of power to give it."

The anti-sexual violence organization RAINN tracks the various state definitions of consent. The differences make for a situation that is "confusing as hell," says Rebecca O'Connor, the group's vice president of public policy.

For many years, O'Connor points out, "we had this he said-she said mentality, where you went into court and if you couldn't prove that you didn't consent, the activity was deemed consensual." Also, most states required that the accuser show force was used, to show lack of consent.

"Of course, our thinking and understanding of these cases has evolved tremendously, and so states have acted in response to that," she says. "What we're finding is especially at moments like this — when it's impossible to ignore the conversation — they are ... re-evaluating the factors that play into the definition of consent and how it can be expressed."

For example, O'Connor says, North Carolina is looking at its law that doesn't allow consent to be revoked once it's been given — which means that if an encounter turns violent, as in a recent reported case, the accused cannot be charged with rape because the woman consented at the beginning.

And several states have passed laws requiring affirmative consent — going further than the usual "no means no" standard to require an actual "yes," though not necessarily verbal. Among those states: Wisconsin, California and Florida. In Florida, consent is defined as "intelligent, knowing, and voluntary consent and does not include coerced submission."

"We're not there yet," O'Connor says, "but a lot of states are starting to move the wheels on this."

The varying definitions of consent can lead to confusion among the people who most need to understand them.

Reimer, the victims' advocate, recalls a Wisconsin case in which a woman had experienced a violent sexual experience with a boyfriend she was trying to break up with. She had consented to sex at other times in their relationship, but was no longer interested. This time, she said no at first, but then stopped resisting as he became more agitated and her children slept nearby.

"She thought she had consented, because she had consented before," Reimer says. "I told her that just because you consent once, it's not a blanket consent. Then she got it — that this time it was rape — and she got angry."

Murphy, at NYU, says that when the American Law Institute began a project several years ago to rewrite sex assault laws in its 1962 Model Penal Code, consent was the first thing it tried to define. The institute — an elite body of judges, lawyers and academics — issues model laws that are often adopted by state legislatures. The project is aimed at updating the laws and dropping some particularly outdated notions, like the idea that rape cannot occur within a marriage.

"It's been a laborious process," notes Murphy. It took about five years to achieve the current consent definition , which recognizes that the essence of consent is willingness — but that how willingness is expressed depends on context.

Murphy says it remains to be seen whether the huge attention now being paid to sexual misconduct will accelerate the process of rewriting laws, or — as in the recent roiling debate over college campuses — make it more complicated. At RAINN, O'Connor says she is hopeful that state lawmakers will pick up the pace of updating their laws with new understandings of concepts like consent.

"We'll see how all this plays out, because when you train the national spotlight on it, suddenly action is born," O'Connor says.

Most important, she says, is for people to recognize that a lack of consent can be expressed in many different ways.

"Yes, there is a legal definition for each state," she says. "But at the end of the day a survivor knows whether or not they consented. I want the message to go out that the criminal activity of another is never a victim's fault, and that extends to the issue of consent."

----------------------------------


These discussions need to be had. The complexities involved tho are making me twitch.
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Old 12-17-2017, 12:22 PM   #56
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Originally Posted by Kobi View Post
A bipartisan senate group introduced new legislation to reform the processes by which sexual harassment investigations involving members of Congress are conducted.

The Congressional Harassment Reform Act — backed by 20 senators both Republican and Democrat — would change the reporting process for victims, end the process’s strict secrecy rules and require lawmakers to pay settlements out of their own pocket rather than taxpayer money.

The bill was supported by U.S. Senators Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY), Ted Cruz (R-TX), Joni Ernst (R-IA), Dianne Feinstein (D-CA), Lisa Murkowski (R-AK), Lindsey Graham (R-SC), John Cornyn (R-TX), Claire McCaskill (D-MO), Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH), Rob Portman (R-OH), Richard Blumenthal (D-CT), Tammy Baldwin (D-WI), Mazie Hirono (D-HI), Elizabeth Warren (D-MA), Cory Booker (D-NJ), Cory Gardner (R-CO), Dan Sullivan (R-AK), Maggie Hassan (D-NH), Kamala Harris (D-CA), and Catherine Cortez Masto (D-NV).

“Congress should never be above the law or play by their own set of rules,” Gillibrand said in a statement. “We must ensure that Congress handles complaints to create an environment where staffers can come forward if something happens to them without having to fear that it will ruin their careers. This bipartisan legislation would bring us much closer to that goal.”

The new legislation comes after a number of members of Congress have stepped down or announced plans to resign amid sexual misconduct scandals. Al Franken resigned last week after multiple women accused him of inappropriate contact. John Conyers of Michigan also resigned after sexual harassment allegations, as did Arizona representative Trent Franks, after it was revealed he asked former staffers to serve as a surrogate. Blake Farenthold and Joe Barton, both of Texas, said they would not seek another term.

https://www.thewrap.com/bipartisan-g...s-in-congress/

-----------------------------------


This is a bit of an improvement. The Congressional Page scandal back in the 1980's managed to, as far as we know at the moment, keep teenage pages safe from preying adult congressmen. This might help except I cannot find the specifics that will make reporting easier and safer.
I'm glad to see so many women are involved in this!
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Old 01-01-2018, 08:13 PM   #57
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I think this is the perfect time for women to confront AND call out any sexual harasser in their work place! ! I believe something has changed, not sure just why, but after hearing the interview with Diane Sawyer and Ashley Judd on ABC the other day I really think this is something that won't be so easily swept under the carpet any longer!

Between the Weinstein, Fox, & Halperin fiasco, plus countless others, Big Corporations are finally 'getting it' I think! The last thing any company wants now is the taint of some sexual harasser/predator in their employ at this place in time! Look how fast NBC fired Mark Halperin!

I think these sexual harassing men are FINALLY running scared, and I also pray I'm not being to much of an optimist!
Since posting this, the fact that NBC fired Matt Lauer without batting an eyelash only reinforces what I believe.
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Old 01-02-2018, 09:14 AM   #58
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Since posting this, the fact that NBC fired Matt Lauer without batting an eyelash only reinforces what I believe.

I would like to think you are correct. However, Lauer was not fired for sexual harassment. He was fired for violating the "morals" clause in his contract. Not sure what the morals clause said but they usually refer to anything that leaves the company open to law suits.

I'm not sure he was fired without batting an eye either. Predatory behavior is always known on some level. When it finds its way to the light of day, companies are now vulnerable to civil suits for a hostile work environment.

Part of me wants to believe companies would act for the benefit of their employees. Part of me knows companies act to protect themselves - especially when they are publicly traded and the powers that be need to be accountable to shareholders.

The NYT is a prime example. They broke the story on Weinstein. Yet, just a few weeks ago their White House reporter Glenn Thrush was being investigated for allegations of inappropriate sexual behavior toward other employees. Their answer was to suspend him, take him off the WH coverage, but retain his services.

Two steps forward and one step backwards.

This is a very complex issue and its complexity becomes evident with each instance and every corporate decision of how to deal with it.

The public has a very short attention span, especially for things that are not black and white, and that cannot be resolved easily.

What I hope is that women have learned a few things about how to protect themselves from the experiences of those who have come forward. Hopefully they have learned to size up a potential problem situation and stay away from it. For example, when a business meeting is charged from an office venue to a hotel venue a red flag should pop up. If you agreed to do it anyway and the hotel door is answered by someone in a bathrobe, turn around and head for the elevators. If a business meeting deteriorates into being asked for a massage, get up and leave. If someone grabs your breast or your junk in public and you find that inappropriate, make your response visible and vocal.

Crisis change is relatively rapid. Real change is painstakingly slow.


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Old 03-05-2018, 07:13 PM   #59
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Default Anita Hill: Do You Believe Her Now?

An dear butch friend sent me the article from the magazine The New York Magazine , published on February 18th, 2018.

Remember how she testified before an senate committee before Clarence Thomas was appointed to be an Supreme Court Justice? And how back then, we had the first huge public case of sexual harassment and how her life was ruined by politicians making bargains with powerful GOP senators and pundits, to limit the scope of testimony proving the amoral behaviors of Clarence Thomas?

The article is superbly written and it goes deeper into the behind the scenes details of what happened to Anita Hill....I highly recommend reading this article for an inside look at how those in power play GOD for the day and participate in covering up behaviors, such as those of an Supreme Court judge nominee, who went on to be installed in an life long position, with his searing and hardly hidden, conservative right-leaning positions, which has altered the face of law on the books pertaining to women and women's rights.

LINK TO ARTICLE:

http://nymag.com/daily/intelligencer...ce-thomas.html
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Old 03-05-2018, 07:25 PM   #60
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Default From 2010.............

I saw that article as well and found this additional info from the NY Times........

In a voice mail message left at 7:31 a.m. on Oct. 9, a Saturday, Virginia Thomas asked her husband’s former aide-turned-adversary to make amends. Ms. Hill played the recording, from her voice mail at Brandeis University, for The New York Times.

“Good morning Anita Hill, it’s Ginni Thomas,” it said. “I just wanted to reach across the airwaves and the years and ask you to consider something. I would love you to consider an apology sometime and some full explanation of why you did what you did with my husband.”

Ms. Thomas went on: “So give it some thought. And certainly pray about this and hope that one day you will help us understand why you did what you did. O.K., have a good day.”
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